About NCR data

The NCR data & figures application allows you to compile the incidence, prevalence, mortality and survival of any and (almost) every type of cancer in the Netherlands. The application will show a table with data and a graph. The option ‘all cancers’ includes all invasive types of cancer, excluding basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

The incidence, prevalence and survival data are derived from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. The mortality is derived from the data on causes of death of the Statistics Netherlands (CBS). These data are based on the cause of death as indicated by the physician.

Would you like to refer to our data? Please include the reference: Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR), Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), derived via www.iknl.nl/en/ncr/ncr-data-figures [date]. 

Incidence

Incidence is the number of new diagnoses per year. Incidence data currently shown in the app are based on data as available from the Netherlands Cancer Registry at the end of January 2021. Data from the two most recent years concern preliminary data, indicated by an asterix for the years 2019 and 2020. Data on incidence can be viewed for sex, age and region (province) of the Netherlands.

The total incidence concerns all invasive cancers, excluding basal cell carcinoma of the skin. Information on the incidence and prevalence of basal cell carcinoma is available up on request. Incidence data include the first invasive malignity per patient per cancer type only. This is in accordance with international agreements aimed at enabling comparison of data between countries. Data on all tumours per patient can be obtained through a data request, if necessary.

Incidence data on breast cancer include all cases of invasive breast cancer and all cases of DCIS. While invasive breast cancer is deduplicated (i.e. only the first diagnosis per patient is counted), DCIS diagnoses have not been deduplicated. This means all DCIS diagnoses are counted, even if there are multiple diagnoses per patient.

Total incidence data of cancer on the urinary tract include Ta/Tis bladder cancer, as well as non-invasive renal pelvis and ureter cancer. Incidence data on bladder cancer also includes Ta/Tis-T4. While invasive bladder cancer is deduplicated (i.e. only the first diagnosis per patient is counted), non-invasive urinary tract cancer diagnoses have not been deduplicated. This means all cases of Ta/Tis and non-invasive diagnoses are counted, even if there are multiple diagnoses per patient.

Incidence data concerning thymomas seem unexpected; because this type of cancer was not properly signalled for several years, there is a decrease in incidence from 2012 throughout 2014.

For more information on the tumour classification, see Tumour classification Netherlands Cancer Registry (xls) 

Unit

When looking at incidence, you can select either the number, CR, ESR and/or WSR as a unit.

  • Number: (an indication of) the absolute number of new diagnoses of a type of cancer in a certain period and/or region
  • CR (Crude Rate): the number of new diagnoses per 100.000 persons per year. In our application, the CR describes the number of new diagnoses per 100.000 persons in the Dutch population. The CR gives a first indication of the occurrence of cancer in a certain population. It allows comparison through time or between regions. This enables us to see if there is a lower/higher cancer rate over time, or if a decrease/increase of absolute incidence is due to an increase or decrease in population.
  • ESR (European Standardized Rate): the number of new diagnoses per 100.000 persons per year corrected for the age structure of the European population (ESP, 1976). The CR will likely be higher in a region with more elderly inhabitants, since cancer is more common among the elderly. Incidence data are therefore usually standardised for the age structure of the population. In European countries data are most commonly standardised using the European age structure, resulting in the European Standardized Rate.
  • WSR (World Standardized Rate): similar to the ESR, but rather than the European age structure, the world age structure is used to standardise incidence data. This rate is very rarely used in Europe, since the world age structure is also largely determined by the age structure of Africa and Asia, which both largely differ from the age structure in Europe.

Update

An update including an incidence prognosis for 2021 will follow on February 3d, 2022.

Prevalence

The prevalence of cancer describes all people alive on a certain date, who at some point have been diagnosed with a type of cancer. The application shows the 5-year prevalence by default. This is the number of people that are still alive 5 years after diagnosis. If you select ‘prevalence’ in the app, you can choose the 10-year prevalence and/or the 20-year prevalence as well. 

The people included under prevalence are therefore a very diverse group, including both people who have been cured as well as people who have just been diagnosed with cancer. For example, the 5 year prevalence on January 1st 2020 concerns all living cancer patients who have been diagnosed in the previous 5 years. The 10 year prevalence and 20 year prevalence includes all living patients who have been diagnosed with cancer in the 10 or 20 years previous to January 1st 2020, respectively.

Prevalence data can be shown categorised by sex and/or by age category. The age category is based on the age of a patient on January 1st of the year from which is looked at the previous 5, 10 or 20 years. 

Update

Prevalence data currently shown in the NCR data app describe data as available from the Netherlands Cancer Registry at the end of January 2021. These data will be updated on February 3d, 2021.

Survival

The survival data concerns the relative survival. It can be viewed for each year of diagnosis (1 year period or 10 year period), sex, age at diagnosis and the stage at diagnosis (TNM-classification). Survival data include data on all invasive cancers, except for data on children younger than 18 and data on persons who were discovered to have tumour only during obduction.

  • The 5-year relative survival rate describes the percentage of patients alive 5 years after they have been diagnosed with a disease, divided by the percentage of people of the same sex and age expected to be alive in the general population at that time.

Survival data can be categorised by sex, age group at diagnosis and period of diagnosis for the 10 most recent years (i.e. from 2009 to 2018). The survival data can also be categorised by stage of disease at diagnosis (TNM classification), corresponding to the different editions of the TNM classification over the years. Periods of different TNM classifications are the 4th edition (1989-1992); 4th edition, 2nd revision (1993-1998); 5th edition (1999-2002); 6th edition (2003-2009); 7th edition (2010-2016) and 8th edition (2017-now).

Some types of cancer, like ALL, bone cancer and eye cancer are relatively common among children. However, the survival rate shown for these cancer types are only based upon data from adult patients. Survival amongst patients younger than 18 is generally better. Questions about incidence, prevalence and survival data on children with cancer can be sent to gegevensaanvraag@iknl.nl

From 1989 nationwide coverage

Since 1989, our data covers the entirety of the Netherlands. This was the starting point of the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Survival data from 1961 until 1988 do not cover the whole Netherlands. Data from the 60’s and 70’s concern an increasing number of hospitals in the Eindhoven area. The data from the 80’s concern hospitals in the North-west and South-east of the Netherlands.

Small groups

In light of the reliability of the data, we have not calculated survival rates for groups that include less than 50 patients. The calculations of survival per stage of disease are not standardised for age.

Update

Survival data are based on the Netherlands Cancer Registry combined with vital status data from the municipal personal records database. Survival data are updated with vital status data until December 31th 2019 and will be updated again during the summer of 2021.

Mortality

Cancer mortality describes the number of patients that die from cancer in a certain period of time (usually 1 year). Mortality data are derived from data on causes of death of the Statistics Netherlands (CBS). Data from the CBS are based on the cause of death as determined by the physician. The CBS categorises cancer types in their cause of death data according to the ICD10. Data on mortality can categorised by sex, age and region (province) of the Netherlands.

Unit

When looking at mortality data, you can select the number, CR, ESR and/or WSR as a unit.

  • Number: (an indication of) the absolute number of deaths of (a type of) cancer in a certain period and/or region.
  • CR (Crude Rate): the number of deaths per 100.000 persons per year. In our application, this describes the number of death per 100.000 persons in the Dutch population. The CR gives a first indication of cancer mortality in a certain population. It allows comparison through time or between regions. 
  • ESR (European Standardized Rate): the number of deaths per 100.000 persons per year corrected for the age structure of the European population (ESP, 1976). The CR will likely be higher in a region with more elderly (since cancer is more common among the elderly), therefore mortality is usually standardised for the age structure of the population. 
  • WSR (World Standardized Rate): similar to the ESR, but rather than the European age structure, the world age structure is used to standardise mortality. This rate is very rarely used in Europe, since the world age structure is also largely determined by the age structure of Africa and Asia, which both differ largely with the age structure in Europe.

Update

Mortality data currently shown in the application concern data as available from the Statistics Netherlands (CBS) on December 18th 2020. Mortality data from the year 2020 will be available on this website on February 3d, 2022.

Life time risk

The life time risk of cancer in the Netherland is available on request, for cancer in general (all invasive tumours) and for every specific cancer type. You can request these data from gegevensaanvraag@iknl.nl.